A.R.S. § 23-107 - Powers Of The Arizona Industrial Commission

The Industrial Commission of Arizona is the state government agency that administers and enforces Arizona state laws relating to the protection of the life, health, safety and welfare of Arizona employees. These laws include laws enacted by the legislature that are related to workers' compensation, occupational safety and health, payment of wages, and child labor. The powers granted to the Industrial Commission by the legislature are set forth in the Arizona Revised Statutes at Section 23-107:

A. The commission has full power, jurisdiction and authority to:

1. Formulate and adopt rules and regulations for effecting the purposes of this article.

2. Administer and enforce all laws for the protection of life, health, safety and welfare of employees in every case and under every law when such duty is not specifically delegated to any other board or officer, and, when such duty is specifically delegated, to counsel, advise and assist in the administration and enforcement of such laws and for such purposes may conduct investigations.

3. Promote the voluntary arbitration, mediation and conciliation of disputes between employers and employees.

4. License and supervise the work of private employment offices, bring together employers seeking employees and working people seeking employment, and make known the opportunities for employment in the state.

5. Collect, collate and publish all statistical and other information relating to employees, employers, employments and places of employment with other appropriate statistics.

6. Act as the regulatory agency insuring that workers' compensation carriers are processing claims in accordance with chapter 6 of this title.

7. Provide nonpublic, confidential or privileged documents, materials or other information to another state, local or federal regulatory agency for the purpose of the legitimate administrative needs of the programs administered by that agency if the recipient agency agrees and warrants that it has the authority to maintain and will maintain the confidentiality and privileged status of the documents, materials or other information.

8. Receive nonpublic documents, materials and other information from another state, local or federal regulatory agency to properly administer programs of the commission. The commission shall maintain as confidential or privileged any document, material or other information that is identified by the exchange agency as confidential or privileged under the laws of the jurisdiction that is the source of the document, material or other information.

9. Enter into agreements that govern the exchange of nonpublic documents, materials and other information that are consistent with paragraphs 7 and 8. The commission may request nondisclosure of information that is identified as privileged or confidential. Any disclosure pursuant to paragraph 7 or 8 or this paragraph is not a waiver of any applicable privilege or claim of confidentiality in the documents, materials or other information.

B. Upon petition by any person that any employment or place of employment is not safe or is injurious to the welfare of any employee, the commission has power and authority, with or without notice, to make investigations necessary to determine the matter complained of.

C. The members of the commission may confer and meet with officers of other states and officers of the United States on matters pertaining to their official duties.

D. Notwithstanding any other law, the commission may protect from public inspection the financial information that is received from a private entity that applies to self-insure or that renews its self-insurance plan pursuant to section 23-961, subsection A if the information is kept confidential by the private entity in its ordinary and regular course of business.

If you are an Arizona employee and you have a legal issues related to workers' compensation, occupational safety and health, payment of wages, and child labor, or any other employment problem, you should consult with an Arizona employment attorney as soon as possible.